Dr. Mathew M. John - Podiatrist - Marietta
2790 Sandy Plains Rd
Marietta, GA 30066
770-977-3668

Dr. John and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you. Or, for a more comprehensive search of our entire Web site, enter your term(s) in the search bar provided.

Also visit www.foothealthfacts.org to learn more about what conditions are treated by podiatric foot & ankle surgeons.


 

Many patients ask:

What is the difference between a podiatrist and an orthopedist?

 

The short answer is that both podiatrists and orthopedists perform surgery on the foot and ankle. This is similar to neurosurgeons and orthopedists both performing back surgery or dermatologists and plastic surgeons both performing cosmetic surgery.

Yet there are some distinctions in choosing a podiatric surgeon for your foot and ankle care:

  • While being the same 4 year length as osteopathic (DO) and allopathic (MD) medical school and covering the same basic and clinical sciences, the podiatric medical school curriculum provides additional intense focus on conditions of the foot, ankle and lower leg.
  • Podiatric surgeons typically complete 3 years of intense residency training in complex foot and ankle surgery. General orthopedists who desire to pursue additional training in foot and ankle surgery typically complete a 1 year fellowship.
  • As Fellows of the American College of Foot & Ankle Surgeons, podiatric surgeons remain among a group of the only physicians who are Board Certified in Foot Surgery and/or Reconstructive Rearfoot Surgery.

 



People call a doctor of podiatry for help diagnosing and treating a wide array of foot and ankle problems. Please contact our office if you experience one of the following:

  • Persistent pain in your feet or ankles.
  • Changes in the nails or skin on your foot.
  • Severe cracking, scaling, or peeling on the heel or foot.
  • Blisters on your feet.

There are signs of bacterial infection, including:

  • Increased pain, swelling, redness, tenderness, or heat.
  • Red streaks extending from the affected area.
  • Discharge or pus from an area on the foot.
  • Foot or ankle symptoms that do not improve after two weeks of treatment with a nonprescription product.
  • Spreading of an infection from one area of the foot to another, such as under the nail bed, skin under the nail, the nail itself, or the surrounding skin.
  • Thickening toenails that cause discomfort.
  • Heel pain accompanied by a fever, redness (sometimes warmth), or numbness.
  • Tingling in the heel; persistent heel pain without putting any weight or pressure on your heel
  • Pain that is not alleviated by ice or over-the-counter painkillers (such as aspirin, ibuprofen or acetaminophen).
  • Diabetics with poor circulation who develop Athlete's Foot.

Mathew M. John, DPM, FACFAS
Foot and Ankle Surgeon
2790 Sandy Plains Rd., Suite 300
Marietta, GA 30066